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news tonight for some of the largest cities in america, and what it says about all of us. >>> and making a difference. a woman on a mission to fight the battle of the bulge, one entire town at a time. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening, with cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi has not only survived any of the strikes that might have landed near him, tonight he appeared on libyan tv in front of a crowd of supporters in tripoli, vowing to be victorious in the end. the u.s. lost a jet there today, an older fighter jet, mechanical failure, they say, and not a shootdown. both pilots are okay. but it could have ended much differently. and in the beginning stages still of this so far u.s.-led attack, a lot of people are wondering how this ends. we begin tonight with our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening? >> reporter: good evening. for american air crews, this is about as tense as it gets. it took more than 12 hours to safely recover both of the downed rmen. what's left of the american fighter jet was sc
on the line for democrats. go ahead. caller: hi. the last time i checked, america was a place that all people could live. i think muslims are people. christians are people. we should tolerate one another. if you want to get angry in this country, there's enough things to get angry about. there are loss of freedoms. there are interfering into other people's countries and their businesses and their ways. we are not going to be satisfied in this country until we run ourselves all the way down into the dirt. host: again, if you like to contact us, you can dial in on the phone numbers. we have set aside our fourth phone line for muslims in the u.s. this morning. 202-628-0184 is the number for you to call and you can also contact us via e-mail or twitter. from "the washington post" this morning, "house hearing to bring debate on islam to the fore." host: that is from "the new york times -- that is from "the washington post." good morning. caller: in republican -- i am republican. i wanted to vote for george bush, but i felt there was going to be a war. i was told that republicans usually engage in
this operation, i want to be clear. the united states of america has done what we said we would do. >> what are you annoyed at us for? we just wanted to know why we were bombing people. nobody said [ bleep ] to us. we were just sitting there, look, we're doing what we said we would do. >> last night nato decided to take on the additional responsibility of protecting libyan civilians. this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. >> so there is an exit strategy. we turned over the mission to nato. man, i feel bad for whoever the sucker is that's the main driving force financially and weaponwise in that organization because those guys are -- wait a minute. we're nato! that's like beyonce saying she's seeding control to sash that fierce. >> welcome to "morning joe." a live look at new york city on this wednesday, march 30th. with us on set, we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. hi, mike. >> mika! >> how are you? >> i'm well now. >> that's good. i have a question for you. yes or no. did you eat a lost cheetos, lucky charms and minute maid lemonade and maybe -- wh
of the reason for the rising prices. so what happened to america's quest for energy independence? where does it stand and what would it take for us to drive prices down? we asked bianna golodryga to find out. >> reporter: every u.s. president for the last 40 years has issued the same ultimatum. >> we will finally end our dependence on oil from the middle ice. >> and america's accepted dependence on foreign oil. >> reporter: so how much have we cut our dependence on foreign oil? turns out we haven't. in fact, we rely even more on it. in 1973 the u.s. produced 64% of all the oil it consumed while importing the rest from foreign sources. half of that prosecutor opec. in 2010, 61% of the oil we consume came from overseas, while our piece of the pie shrank to less than 40%. almost ten years after 9/11 and a rededication to reducing oil imports, still no change. >> political will is the main thing that's keeping us from relying less on foreign oil. we can't change things overnight. we need to bring down the cost of alternatives and push them into the economy but in we don't get started now we'll n
their support for america. >> reporter: armed rebels took the american to a hotel in benghazi. from there, the airmen telephoned american forces who sent a helicopter to pick him up. meanwhile, u.s. and coalition forces continued their bombing campaign against libyan anti-aircraft offenses. in moscow today, the russian defense minister lectured robert gates over libyan reports that u.s. air strikes had killed civilians. gates fired bark. >> it's perfectly evident that the vast majority if not nearly all civilian casualties have been inflicted by gadhafi. >> reporter: the u.s. military is also scrambling tonight to meet president obama's deadline to turn over this no fly mission to coalition allies within days instead of bombing american warplanes, will provide overhead surveillance, radio jamming and refuelling. brian? >> jim miklaszewski starting us off from the pentagon. >>> let's go to our team on the ground inside libya, first to tripoli and jim maceda, who had a chance to inspect some of the bomb damage there. jim, good evening. >> reporter: we did get a chance to break the routine o
this great nation, the united states of america is not going to become the united states of europe, not on our watch. thank you. [cheers and applause] . >> up next speaker is the former speaker, newt gingrich. [cheers and applause] he immersed himself in the study of history, in getting a master's in note -- history, getting a master's degree. he taught college for eight years. he was first elected to congress in 1978, where he served the six district -- sixth district. "the washington times" has called him "the indispensable leader." he got a man of the year in 1995. "meters make a possible. exceptionable leaders made them inevitable we do leaders make things possible -- leaders make things possible. exceptional leaders make them inevitable." under his leadership, congress passed welfare reform and the first balanced budget in a generation and the first tax cut in 16 years. a strong advocate of volunteerism, gingrich talks about the positive impact every individual can have. he has raised millions, including for habitat for humanity, cerebral palsy notep -- als --palsy, and others
defend the constitution of the united states of america. we commissioned a survey by public opinion strategies, one of the most respected polling organizations, and let me tell you what they found. in spite of all that talk about it being about the economy and jobs, and jobs and the economy were critical, they found that 32% of the entire electorate on november 2 was made up of conservative and evangelical christians who voted 70%-21% republican, and they were the booster rocket that drove the biggest landslide in a century, and will be the key to victory in 2012 and again. i know that sometimes when people go to washington they lose 20 i.q. points, and some have more despair than others. there is a tendency sometimes among the punditocracy to think that moral issues should be kept out of polite conversation. that social conservatives should ride in the back of the bus. my message to the national republican party tonight is simple -- if you turn your backs on the pro-family-pro-life consider freezing -- constituency, you will be consigned to permanent minority status. some have sugg
, read state and blue state. our listeners are equally distributed throughout every part of america, because of our unique network of local member stations. rooted in their communities, locally owned, operated, and staffed, these are citizens serving citizens. our listener is still a personal connection to what we do. not long ago, i was walking in reception with npr "morning edition" hosts, and we are radio, but as we mingled and introduced ourselves, i was struck by their reaction people had when they realized who he was. not merely a media celebrity, but someone with whom they feel a deep personal connection. and then of course, always the same joke, i wake up with you every morning. he is a good sport about it. he laughs each time like it is the first time he has ever heard it. and he is in cairo tonight so you will hear his reports from the region over the next several weeks. our listeners tell us they appreciate that our reporters report. and so do our hosts. our listeners tell us they come to us for the craftsmanship, the stability of our programming, and the range of opinion
here in america. king flat out says he doesn't care if it's politically correct. the main witnesses that we're going to see that he's invited are family members of those inspired to get into terrorism. and also an american muslim that will talk about the culture of his community. t.j., last night, eight democrats on this committee wrote king asking him to cancel the hearing, saying it too narrowly singles out the community. listen to eric holder. >> we don't want to stigmatize, we don't want to alienate entire communities. we need to focus on individuals or groups of individuals, who might band together and who would try to harm american interests or american citizens. that is what this justice department is doing. >> now, i spoke with congressman king last night, he insists he does not want to demonize the muslim-american community. he also said, look if my job is to look for radicalization from al qaeda, where else am i going to look? one of the issues that king says drives him a report that he gets from his friends and law enforcement community at home in new york and around the
can tell it is written by me. i am curious. how many teachable america alumni currently in the program are here? pretty amazing. first question. was there a time where american education was not in crisis? >> some -- >> you can just say yes if you want. >> no. i think we have had this issue -- i have limited historical knowledge myself but i am sure we have had these issues forever. we have been in denial about this particular issue that we are working to address. i think 20 years ago a lot of people were in denial about the very existence of what we call today educational inequity. >> security offices and police and less and less recess time, school menus that require a law degree to decipher with rule upon rules, longer school days, why would a child want to go to school? >> i think about the school's, talking about these transformational schools. kids are dying to be in school because first of all the principal and teachers love their kids and they build a community among them and the kids know that they will work incredibly hard but there is a huge pay off for that. i don't know th
'll see top to bottom coverage right here on cnn. i also want to draw your attention to a cnn in america special, "unwelcome: the muslims next door." soledad o'brien chronicles the dramatic fight over the building of a mosque in the heart of the bible belt. her special report airs sunday, march 27th at 8:00 p.m. eastern only on cnn. >>> on to other stories now, starting with the libyan civil war. pro-government troops appear to have taken on bin jawad. medical sources tell cnn at least five people were killed there yesterday. and air strike today targeted the main road into ras lanuf. an oil town that remains in the control of the opposition. in fact, many of the pipes, the pipelines in libya, lead to ras lanuf and shipped out. opposition forces responded with anti-aircraft fire. witnesses tell cnn that opposition forces also remain in control of misrata. seeing it here. a doctor says at least 42 people were killed there on sunday. >>> a supreme court ruling announced today gives a texas death row inmate another chance to prove his innocence. in a 6-3 decision, the court ruled that dna e
on "the washington post," a study on sex in america, study finds abstinence on rise in teens, early 20s. i've been saying for some time and some time looking at my kids and their friends over the past few years -- >> right. >> i've noticed a, in the age of pornography where a kid who is 9 or 10 is exposed to stuff we weren't exposed to until we were in college or even later, a more conservative generation regarding sex. and here it says the number of teens and people in the early 20s who remain abstinent goes well into the early -- it goes close to a third, mike barnicle. this is a dramatic shift. our youth are becoming more conservative when it comes to abstinence and sex. i think it's a reaction to all those images they're bombarded with at an early age. >> i think part of it, i think you put your finger on part of it, is the unbelievable access that kids have, everyone has, to stuff on the internet from the age of 8, 9, 10 years of age. i am the wrong guy to talk to about this, joe. i was raised with a deep belief and taught that sex is more dangerous than the third rail. >> right. >> j
kabul and washington. >>> this week congress takes a closer look at radical islam in america. the muslim community says it is being singled out, demonized, in fact, for the acts of a few. we asked a muslim woman whose son was killed on 9/11 what she thinks. >>> nhl fights are part of the game but at what skos of the players. researchers have looked into the brain of a former enforcer and found evidence of trauma. >>> who will kate middleton be wearing when she says "i do"? the princess may share a look with lady gaga. we'll explain. >>> this week congress holds hearings on radical islams in america. peter king thinks al qaeda is recruiting and the muslim community isn't cooperating with authorities. king thinks the government needs to investigate. >> i have said the overwhelming majority of muslims are outstanding americans. but there is an effort to radicalize elements within the islamic community. right now there is an effort, this suspect just me, this is eric holder who says he worries about young muslim men being radicalized. >> protesters showed up in the rain to denounce the heari
about tightening the belt, but nobody talks about the companies in america tightening their belts. if we went back to a flat tax, no tax break, no tax shelters, everyone pays 10%, that would help our economy, the american families, and it would let big business pay what they should pay. guest: here is one of the big issues we are dealing with that. people at oil companies are making a lot of money. we are dealing with a major energy crunch right now. people can look at oil companies and say, they have record profits and we have record high prices. the fact is, we are dealing with record high prices in oil. if we could add energy from our own country, we could manage that and it would be different. fluctuations from overseas would not still be occurring, at this point. people also talk about oil companies getting tax breaks. it is that ability to write off their business expenses. it is the same as other companies. people say that they are larger and these small companies, but they are, they are larger businesses. people want to pick on that. what would they do if they pulled that out? th
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talking about organized crime. laundering things through south america and bringing them into america. >> hey, how much? >> reporter: back at the flea market, we are undercover, too. we're looking for a brown one. suddenly vendors start to pack up. where are you going? >> they said the cops are here so we're packing. >> reporter: some take off running. they don't get far. police arrest six suspects in all. when we talked to them, most deny selling counterfeits or being part of a larger network. >> i didn't sell anything to anybody. >> reporter: because of north carolina's tough stance, they could face felony charges. do you realize what a risk that is in this state? >> now i do. >> reporter: authorities say often the vendors are low-level players, forced to sell to pay off a debt. are they making you work out here selling this stuff? >> it's not even my stuff. >> reporter: later, at a secret warehouse nearby, officers count and catalog all the merchandise, now evidence in criminal cases. the final tally? more than $700,000 in confiscated counterfeits. counterfeiters are getting way be
>>> good morning, america. i'm robin roberts. >> and i'm george stephanopoulos. it's wednesday, march 2nd. and there's more news overnight from charlie sheen. his kids taken away from his home last night, after his soon-to-be ex-wife gets a restraining order against him. we have his response this morning. >>> as colonel gadhafi appears again this morning, the turmoil in libya causes the american economy to slide. as oil prices spike, sending stocks plummeting and gas prices soaring. what it means for your wallet. >>> mistreating mickey rooney. the shocking abuse he said he suffered from his own family member. his public plea today. >>> designer disgrace. the swift fall of one of the most famous and controversial designers, now booted from christian dior, after a drunken rant, praising hitler, all caught on tape. >>> hello, everyone. let's get right to it. a dramatic night at charlie sheen's house. conflicting reports about his custody battle. he has two girls with denise richards. and twin boys with brooke mueller. >> abc news confirms that his twin boys were taken from sheen's
america." sharifa rhodes-pitts focuses on black life in harlem. we're glad you have joined us. aaron eckhart and author sharifa rhodes-pitts coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financiaraitend acyem reovte an obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thk an [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: pleased to welcome aaron eckhart back to this program. his movies include "thank you for smoking," "the dark knight" and "in the company of men." his latest, "battle: los angeles," the film opens everywhere friday. here now a scene from "battle: los angeles." >> oh, just a little doggy. it is just a dog. dog. what's his name, huh? >> glen. >> who
about it. think about the history of innovation. what sets america apart is so many of our great inventions start out in small garages and labs with driven, inspired people who have great ideas, developed them and then they take off. i mention companies that have started this way yesterday. hewlett packard, apple, google, and there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of others. they started from humble beginnings, and they grew spectacularly, creating jobs for millions of americans and lifting up our economy and standard of living. i know an inventor who invented sky vodka, and the vodka he drank disturbed his stomach, so he figured out biologically and chemically what it was, and he invented a vodka called sky vodka. small inventor. that company was subsequently sold, i think for a great deal of money, but it started with one man who had a stomachache from drinking vodka. now, this may be just one type of example, but apple is certainly another type of example. a garage many years ago in california, and out of that emerged this giant company. so these companies start from humble
and look at our schedule. we will bring a panel called becoming america, immigration memoirs across the decades with former arizona governor raul castro, ishmael beah, paula fass and chiquis barron. that will be followed by a panel on climate change with melanie leonard laura lopez hoffman and mitch tobin. hones and pagers an would likeo tr speak it is my great honor to introduce you to these four authors who enrich our knowing. raul castro's look "adversity is my angel" was cowritten with jack augusrat jr.. castor was born in mexico in 1916, the son of a copper miner and a midwife. he worked himself through school is worked himself through school by plucking chickens, panning gold and waiting tables. in 1974 he made history when he was elected arizona's very first and to date only mexican-american governor. he will also answer to judge and ambassador. paula fass is a professor of history at the university of california berkeley. a distinguished scholar and resident at rutgers university, shea specializes in the history of children and childhood. in her seventh book, "inheriting the
call the duck. it said, america now up for grabs, and it was referring to this concert that the rolling stones had in december of 1969. and this was supposed to have been a triumphant affair. they appeared with carlos santana and the jefferson airplane, and they had a hard time sort of finding a venue for this show at the last minute, so they did it at altamont speedway. and it turned out to be a disaster. thousands of people sort of clamored on top of each other to get close to the stage. someone had the bright idea of hiring the hell's angels motorcycle gang to do security, and they paid them, allegedly, with a truckload of beer. it was a really violent scene, so the hell's angels were brutalizing and beating up spectators and probably would have been less violent if rolling stones had played a little earlier. the concert was being filmed for a documentary called "give me shelter," which you probably are familiar with. anyhow, mick jagger was reluctant to play until it was dark because he thought it he wd look better under the stage lights. it was just a violent, ugly scene, and the r
, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public very hard and it's not in their culture, that's like having histrionics. this is a society going through mass shock at the moment. >> a cultural difference. >> they prepare all their lives for the big one, all trained for it. when it happens and you've lost your father or daughter or lost your spouse, it's heartbreaking. >> of course, the big news, mika, yet, obviously, more nuclear problems, the situation goes from bad
the every-changing situation in japan. we'll have live updates on "america this morning" and later on "good morning america." also stay up to date any time at abcnews.com. >>> moving on to other news beginning with libya. four "new york times" journalists who have been covering the fighting there are now missing. pull its zero prize winning reporter anthony shadid, stephen farrell and photographers tyler hicks and linsey add dario were last heard from on tuesday. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's forces have been battling rebels in a key city in eastern libya. there could be a vote today in the u.n. security council on whether to impose a no-fly zone over libya. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton was in cairo talking through an unscheduled stroll -- taking an unscheduled stroll through tahrir square, the symbolic center of egypt's revolution. she urged egyptians to not let extremists ruin what they've already accomplished. clinton saying she will not stay on as the nation's top diplomat if president obama is re-elected. she also says she has no interest in another run for the whit
on "america this morning" and "good morning america," we'll take you back to japan for the very latest on the ongoing disaster. >>> in other news, the persian gulf nation of bahrain is under a three month state of emergency. a reaction to what's escalated into deadly political unrest. demonstrators are calling for political reforms and a change in bahrain's long established monarchy. the military force led by saudi arabia has been clashing with the protesters. so far at least three people have died and hundreds more injured. the u.s. navy's main base in the region is located in bahrain. >>> and in libya, moammar gadhafi's forces appear set for an offensive on the main stronghold of the rebellion there. opposition fighters were routed from a key city yesterday opening the way to their base in benghazi. in his newest comment gadhafi called the rebels rats and also claimed only hundreds not thousands have been killed in the fighting. >>> and with that, here's a look at your wednesday weather. a wet day from san francisco north with seattle expecting heavy rain. up to 2 feet of snow in the
morning, everybody, i'm martha mcoccasionum -- maccallum, here in "america's newsroom". rick: i'm rick folbaum. naughto has full control over all air operation and is promise to go protect all citizens there, nato also ruling out arming the rebels trying to hold their positions against qaddafi's forces in brega. they have been losing ground in several key areas that they had won control of just a couple of days ago and right now, there are reports of cia operatives on the ground, working with the rebels. martha: that's right. a lot of confusion over there. nato saying they will not arm the rebels, the discussion at the white house taking a slightly different tone on that. rick leventhal is on the ground watching it all for us, streaming live from tow bruk -- from tobruk, libya. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, martha. the cia teams may be meeting with rebels leaders to determine whether or not they can give them weapons, but as far as we know, that hasn't happened. wep in brega yesterday as rebel fighters headed off into the desert to try and take on qaddafi's forces which as y
, stacked high on thick texas toast. wrap your hands around one at dunkin'. america runs on dunkin'. grab a big breakfast with the new big n' toasty sandwich from dunkin' donuts. >>> good morning, we have the weather and traffic together. we'll begin with marty. >>> 12 hours from now, we'll totally be at the beginning of a full day of rain moving our way. enough so that the graphic is prepared. we have a coastal and inland flood watch in effect areawide. here's the first warning doppler weather radar. we'll go on the mosaic scan. that combines all of the pictures. think that's a lot of rain? you ain't seen nothing yet. that's the weather essentially through tomorrow night. >>> now, over to kristy breslin in traffic control. >>> we're following the accident in baltimore city at mclean and westbound northern parkway. westfield is the best bet around that. there's a minor slowdown approaching security boulevard. same division for 95 southbound on the north east corner. >>> and taking a look at the overall drive times from 795 to 95, 54 minutes average and 12 minutes to get by. that's the har
's what america's all about. we need teachers in america. they sacrifice some of their presented to help their kids' future. they're special people. they believe in public affairs and getting involved. same way -- you know, illinois about four weeks ago had the worst blizzard we had in recent memory. we had workers out 12 hours at a shift in whiteout conditions plowing 16,800 miles of highway in illinois. they did it with great distinction. those are our best of the best. they're public servants. they deserve a decent pay. they deserve to have a union. i don't agree with everything the unions say. i negotiate with them. that's what america is all about. it's talking to each other. not just trying to kick the other guy in the shin and exterminate them. >> each night, chris matthews delivers an hour of fiery political debate and hard-hitting, take-no-prisoners interviews. don't miss "hardball with chris matthews" weeknights at 5:00 and 7:00 eastern only on msnbc, the place for politics. >>> meanwhile, as muammar gadhafi struggles to maintain power in libya, u.s. officials are calling him "
golove will discuss the implications of >> it is true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. given the cost and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what is right. ♪ host: president obama on monday night on a speech that was not from the oval office. president obama addressed the nation from the national defense university in washington in a speech that lasted 25 minutes in front of a largely military audience that remained quiet for much of the address. the president said that when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. we want to hear from all of you this morning and get your thoughts from the president's speech last night. "the washington post" headline this morning phrases it like that. the president went on to say that even though america's safety was not at risk when it came to libya, we did have to act against colonel gaddafi in libya. here is what he had to say. >> there will be times when our safety is not
because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller: i believe military force would only be appropriate if our country were to be in danger, simply because when we get involved in other countries' problems, then the entire world will believe that any time they have a problem, america can help them immediately. that they themselves don't need to help themselves. we would be like superman -- whenever somebody has a problem the call out for the only superpower to help them. host: your point of the stories is that you think the population of to be working organically without support from the u.s.? caller: the big thing we want is democracy. i particularly don't believe in democracy. i believe in a democratic republic, which is different. the government with laws, where democracy is
. meanwhile, president obama has cut short his tour of latin america amid criticism of his leadership of the attack on libya. the president says he has, quote, absolutely no doubt that a success vl transfer of power to coalition powers will take place in a matter of days. tracie potts joins us from washington with the latest on this. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. that's been the big question. when do we get out of all this and some question why did we get into it in the first place. in that news conference from el savlador, president obama said that he made this decision after realizing that the cost outweighed the benefits. some here on capitol hill disagree with that and are criticizing him for overstepping his congressional authority and not seeking congressional support first. even some supporters say they hope he'll come back and seek an authorization of force. representative dennis kucinich is pushing for an action to stop all action in libya, even so far as saying this may be an impeachable defense. as far as how soon this will all be over, secretary of state hillary clinton
forward that can give americans a diversity of choices in transportation and energy. we need america to be -- we're in a competition with the rest of the world on developing clean energy technologies. the country an the companies that develop these technologies in the future will own the market. and i want to united states to own the market. those are the things that keep me up, awake at night. these other issues, we are worried about, we're concerned. we're acting responsibly, and we will continue to. >> good luck. we're all counting on you. >> okay. thank you. >>> new video coming into "the situation room" about the battle in misrata in libya. we're taking you live for a closer look at what this video tells us about the rebels. standby. and several senators behind closed doors getting the latest classified information on libya. we're going to be talking to one of them just out of that briefing. stamps.com is the best. i don't have to leave my desk and get up and go to the post office anymore. >>> let's go back live to the breaking news in libya in moments. escalating fears of civil
being defeated. back to you. >>> now here's a look at other stories making news early today in america. in tennessee, it was a one-two punch of mother nature's worst. a severe storm system caused flash flooding and destruction of homes. in one area, officials believe tornados ripped through, but the national weather service has not been able to confirm. in north carolina, an explosion of glass and metal was caught on a tape when a bus crashed into a boutique. the driver crossed through oncoming traffic and drove through sh rubbery. the driver has no memory of the accident. in florida, heavy winds and dry conditions are fueling a fast-moving wildfire. the blaze has forced officials to shut down and a road and is now threatening nearby communities. >>> finally, in iowa, a stretch of highway offered a spectacular show of wildlife. dozens of bald eagles could be seen perched on a tree and then tree after tree. some motorists pulled over to snap photos while others marvelled at the rare sighting that made a few of them come too a streeching halt. >>> now for a look at your national and regi
. >>> eleven minutes after five. forbes.com out with the list of what they call america's most toxic cities. topping the list, our neighbors, philidelphia. the magazine says the city of brotherly love has poor water quality and a lot of sites that contain hazarous materials. here we go, bakersfield, california, fresno, new york, and baton rouge louisiana. >>> now, maryland's most powerful doppler radar and the forecast certified most accurate by weatherate. >>> 5:12. good morning. and we are looking at the second day of march. i was looking over some statistics on this date two years ago. we had a 4 to 6 inch snowfall. we could all dream. today is a different story. we are quiet with a little breeze and clear skies this morning. east op, you are not report ding-- easton, you are there but not reporting a temperature. the hour by hour forecast takes us into the 50s by lunchtime. a few clouds but a cold frontapproaching. we will push 58 as the two degree guarantee and drop to the colder side of normal tomorrow. now kim. >> reporter: you will find all lanes open on the 95. no problems between
across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: congressman peter king's hearings in washington. king, the new york republican and house homeland security committee chairman began the day by defending his inquiry and vowing to go on. >> let me make it clear today that i remain convinced that these hearings must go forward and they will. to back down would be a craven surrender to political correctness and an abdication of what i believe should be the main responsibility of this committee: to protect america from a terrorist attack. despite what passes for conventional wisdom in certain circles, there's nothing radical or un-american in holding these hearings. indeed, congressional investigation of muslim american radicalization is the logical response to the repeated and urgent warnings which
speak a hundred lungs of languages and come from all over the globe. in america we don't do language very well or culture very well. the largest somali population is in minute -- minneapolis. we've got kids speaking multiple languages so these businesses have begun to say i get it and they'll hire a few for the summer and help get through college. i think we've got to talk about an asset-based way of having a diverse community. >> charlie: mayors and their cities when we continue. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> tonight a distinguished group of mayors look at cities, the urban experience with all of its possibilities and challenges. they face tough decisions, how
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